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Curious1

Homemade Bouillon, a veggie paste that supposedly keeps for 6 months if placed in a

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Posted to Thread #17436 at 2:37 pm on Jan 16, 2010

sterilized jar and refrigerated.

This looks really interesting and as Lisa said above, the canned versions aren't very good. I saw it this morning on the blog, 101 Cookbooks.

Homemade Bouillon
This recipe requires a food processor. I have a 8-cup / 2 liter / 2 quart model, and needed every cubic inch of it. I found the best approach if you are tight for space in your food processor is to add a few of the ingredients, then pulse a few times. The ingredients collapse and free up more space for the next few ingredients. Also, it is worth noting, Pam suggests preserving the bouillon in sterilized jars for up to six-months, but I was too lazy to do any sterilizing, and opted for the freezer.

5 ounces / 150 g leeks, sliced and well-washed
7 ounces / 200g fennel bulb, chopped
7 ounces / 200g carrot, well scrubbed and chopped
3.5 ounces / 100 g celery
3.5 ounces / 100g celery root (celeriac), peeled and chopped
1 ounce / 30g sun-dried tomatoes
3.5 ounces / 100g shallots, peeled
3 medium garlic cloves
9 ounces / 250g fine grain sea salt
1.5 ounces / 40 g flat-leaf parsley, loosely chopped
2 ounces / 60g cilantro (coriander), loosely chopped

Place the first four ingredients in your food processor and pulse about twenty times. Add the next four ingredients, and pulse again. Add the salt, pulse some more. Then add the parsley and cilantro. You may need to scoop some of the chopped vegetables on top of the herbs, so they get chopped. Mine tended to want to stay on top of everything else, initially escaping the blades.

You should end up with a moist, loose paste of sorts. Keep 1/4th of it in a jar in the refrigerator for easy access, and freeze the remaining 3/4 for use later. Because of all the salt it never actually solidifies making it easy to spoon directly from the freezer if needed.

Start by using 1 teaspoon of bouillon per 1 cup (250 ml), and adjust from there based on your personal preference.

Makes roughly 3 1/2 cups.


Link: http://www.101cookbooks.com/archives/homemade-bouillon-recipe.html


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